Author: Martha Dietzel

Feb 8

Digital Learning Day Contest

Congratulations to winners Guillermo, Jairo, and Luna!

Guillermo (age 12)

Jairo (age 10)

Luna (age 9)

Did you know? February 25th is Digital Learning Day! Digital Learning Day is a time to celebrate innovative technology practices in education and think about how we can intentionally bring digital tools into tutoring sessions.

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to push the boundaries of what technology can do for education. It has also shown us how crucial it is for our students to not only have access to technology, but also technology skills. This year, now that all our students are tutoring online, we want to put their digital devices to use to enhance their 21st Century skills.

In celebration of Digital Learning Day, we want to see your students use Scratch – a program we love that teaches kids creative coding. All students who create an “Animate a Name” project and submit it us will be entered to win a special prize. Watch the video below for all the details. Kindergarten-3rd grade students have the option to complete a different project if Scratch is too difficult for them. Scroll down for more details.

How to enter the contest:

  1. Before your session, create a Scratch account (it’s free!)
  2. During your session, instruct your student to share their screen with you.
  3. Have your student go to Scratch, log into the account you created, and create an animated name or word using the above tutorial as a guide.
  4. Creativity is encouraged! Your student can animate their name, or a phrase like “School on Wheels,” “Learn,” “Grow,” or “Think.”
  5. When their project is complete, instruct them to name the project and click “Share.” Have them share the link with you, or access the link yourself via the account you created.
  6. Submit your student’s project using the form below by March 25th.

Option for K-3 students:

  1. Before your session, download the Odd Squad Robot Coder activity sheet from PBS Kids.
  2. During your session, upload the activity sheet using the “Upload a Presentation” feature in Big Blue Button. Turn on the multi-user whiteboard.
  3. Explain that “Coding” means giving a computer commands to complete tasks. Coding is what makes robots and other machines work. Explain to your student that they will use arrow commands to program Agent Oswald.
  4. Have your student use the whiteboard tools to complete both pages of the activity sheet.
  5. Optional: If you have time, try completing this additional coding activity, which uses a similar process.
  6. Take screenshots of the completed pages and submit the files via the form below by March 25th.

Contact egerch@schoolonwheels.org with questions.

Jan 14

General and Special Education Rights of Foster Youth and Youth Experiencing Homelessness

Learn about the education rights of foster youth and youth experiencing homelessness, and how to advocate for these rights during and after the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in light of nationwide school closures.

Materials referenced in this presentation:

About the Presenter: Jill Rowland is the Education Program Director at the Alliance for Children’s Rights. Jill is an expert in every area of education impacting foster youth, including early intervention, special education, general education, school discipline, and interrupting the school-to-prison pipeline. Jill has grown the Alliance’s Education Program in response to client needs: from pioneering legal representation for early intervention services to addressing the unique trauma-related education needs of foster youth. Her approach led to the creation of the Foster Youth Education Toolkit and its Court Companion, the training of thousands of school district and foster/probation system personnel (including social workers, probation officers, attorneys, and judges), and multiple school districts adopting improved foster youth policies. Jill is passionate about providing foster and probation youth with an equitable education so they can succeed in life. She earned her JD at UCLA School of Law, specializing in Critical Race Studies. She majored in Communications and Sociology at UCSB.

Dec 8

Pandemic Intensifies Economic Disparities for Neediest Students

Distance learning has been a challenge for all students and their families, but for the estimated one out of 20 children in California experiencing homelessness, the challenges can seem insurmountable.

The pandemic has intensified the economic disparities, putting the neediest students at a further disadvantage.

“I am very scared and terrified for our families and our students,” said Charles Evans, the executive director of School on Wheels. “They’ve had to overcome so much with being homeless and then you add that other layer of distance learning.”

Coverage from NBC Los Angeles

Pandemic Intensifies Economic Disparities for Neediest Students
Homeless Students Get Help With Online Learning
Distance Learning Presents Extra Challenges to Homeless Families

Coverage from LA Times

Nov 18

We Are Thankful for You

In a year fraught with uncertainty it can be challenging, yet essential, to note glimmers of hope. Hope comes when volunteers support students in their formative years. Hope comes when donors and supporters fund programs that enhance marginalized communities. Hope comes when frontline workers dedicate themselves to serving their community. We give thanks for all these glimmers of hope and we give thanks for your support—not just of School on Wheels, but of any of the thousands of organizations that are working to make our community a better place.

We want to express our deepest gratitude to our community of supporters. Your time, talents, and contributions have allowed us to match more than 2,000 amazing kids with their very own tutor. Because of you, our students got the support that they wouldn’t have received otherwise. May this act as a reminder that a little hope goes a long way. Please continue to take care of yourself and others as we embark on this season of thankfulness. 

Charles Evans
Executive Director

Oct 7

Working to Bridge the Digital Divide for Our Students

The lack of access to digital and technology resources is not a new phenomenon facing school-aged children of color and children experiencing poverty. A recent study found that, nationally, around 17% of children are unable to complete their homework due to limited internet access. This “digital divide” and resulting “homework gap” mirrors trends in California, where about 1 in 6 school-aged children lack access to the internet at home. These numbers grow for the state’s most vulnerable children: students of color, low-income students, English Learnersstudents with disabilities, and homeless youth.  

The Education Trust West

The data is stark when it comes to the digital divide for our students, as these recent headlines illustrate:

This week is Digital Inclusion Week. Digital Inclusion Week is an online event held October 5-9, 2020 to raise awareness of solutions addressing home internet access, personal devices, and local technology training and support programs. Visit the official website to learn more and get involved. To celebrate this event we are spotlighting some of our recent efforts and partnerships as we work to bridge the digital divide for our students as part of our digital learning initiative.

Online Tutoring for All Students

In 2014, School on Wheels established its online tutoring program as a response to reach students that were geographically difficult to reach in Southern California. Our online tutoring program provides a live online classroom in which students and tutors interact synchronously through audio, video, and a shared whiteboard. From 2014 to 2020, School on Wheels has served close to 2,000 students in hard-to-reach areas such as Apple Valley, Lancaster, and San Diego with the help of hundreds of online tutors from 26 states across the country. We would not have been able to serve many of these students through our in-person tutoring programs.

Prior to the onset of COVID-19 in March of 2020, School on Wheels provided 90% in-person tutoring and 10% online tutoring. As a response to the circumstances surrounding the pandemic, we have transitioned 100% of our tutoring online, and we have reached almost 900 students since March. While BigBlueButton is our main online tutoring software, students without robust internet and/or technology utilize other tools such as FaceTime and Google Duo to connect with their tutors. School on Wheels students and tutors are meeting exclusively online for the foreseeable future.

Summer Rewards Program

Our Summer Rewards Program was a massive hit! Any student who completed at least 5 full tutoring sessions between July 1st and August 17th qualified for a free device. Most qualifying K-3 students received Amazon Kindles or Amazon Fires (Kids Edition), students in grades 4-8 received Android tablets, and students in grades 9-12 received Chromebooks. 303 students qualified, participating in 2,878 hours of tutoring over the summer (thanks to the help and support of our amazing volunteer tutors)!

Technology access is crucial to students’ success during this time and we are so thankful to be able to provide devices that our students can keep and utilize to attend school and engage in learning.

Bel Air Internet Partnership

School on Wheels and Bel Air Internet are working together to bridge the digital divide and provide free high-speed Internet access for children experiencing homelessness in Southern California. Since January of 2019, BAI has provided its services to 6 of our sites. As a result, over 400 of our students have regular access to the Internet that they would otherwise not have. 

Since the beginning of the pandemic, Bel Air Internet has installed high-speed internet/WiFi at 3 of our sites (with others in the works): Orange County Rescue Mission (Village of Hope) in Tustin, Motorcycle Riders in South Los Angeles, and HomeAid Family Care Center in Orange.

We are incredibly lucky to have such a great partner who helps us grow our impact and provide learning opportunities to more students.

Technology Donors

We have been able to purchase many tablets, Chromebooks, and other necessary hardware for our students with donated funds. In addition, we have had many generous technology donors, including Microsoft, AT&T, T2 Tech Group, and PBSSoCal.