Dec 30

Tutor Anniversaries December 2018

We would like to give a huge shout out to all of these amazing tutors who have volunteered with us for a year or more! We couldn’t impact the lives of thousands of children without you.

Seven Years
Margaret Maccurdy

Five Years
Emily Brown

Four Years
Geena Conde
Debra Kaufman
Maria Ortiz
Nicole Liddicote

Three Years
Amber Monterosso
Jonathan Garcia
Susan Porter
Peter Banachowski

Two Years
Peter Abbay
Laura Strauss
Anna Stroud
Stephen Nixon
Leeanne Lim
Bonnie Denes
Sara Woldegebriel
Gary Young
Maggie Liu

One Year
Julie Mendoza
Prapatsorn Nishii
Cameron Johnson
Emily Cohen
Christina Schoellkopf
Diana Casillas
Rachael Becker
Aren Mirzakhanian
Erick Alvarenga
Martha Wilson
Bernadette Baclig
Samantha Baclig
Khushi Patel
Tucker Blum

Nov 30

Tutor Anniversaries November 2018

We would like to give a huge shout out to all of these amazing tutors who have volunteered with us for a year or more! We couldn’t impact the lives of thousands of children without you.

Five Years
Karen Gray

Four Years
Erin Fitts

Three Years
Marisol Sacramento
Wendy Rodriguez
Mari Santos
Tolulope Popoola
Julie Davis
Rebecca Anders
Rosalva Meza
Ana Morales-Galvan
Ann Buckley
Aeden Keffelew

Two Years
Harrison Miller
Audrey Hsu
Amaury Dehecq
Dylan Bruss
Valerie Patscheck
Alfonse Nobile
Alli Rowe
Yu Fang Pan
Sue Strozewski
Chris Ruoff

One Year
Amy Hernandez
Clayton Button
Jason Hale
Sarah Pretsky
Gretchen Torrence
William Bentley
Kristin Caiella
Emily Tokheim
Melissa Haylock
Taylor Morgan
Vanessa Nguyen
Prema Ramakrishnan
Lauren Bowen
Deborah Huang
Benjamin Saunders
Ariane Mc Kiernan
Jin Soo Kang
Larinda Williams
Raymonda Wehbe
Ashley Newton
Manuel Pira
Madeleine Pira
John Jawiche
Jesica Mendoza
Griffin Rashoff
Samantha Pedersen
Michael Wittlin
Avani Kothari
Kara Taylor
Peter Nee
Kim Newton
Jason Campa

Nov 28

Whether home is a van, a motel or a garage, L.A.’s suburban poor children learn to survive

Thousands of families experience homelessness on any given night in America, leaving many children stricken by the grief of instability and unpredictability. There is a saying in Skid Row, “homeless but not hopeless.” But where does your hope come from if you’re the mother of four young, energetic children crammed in a motel room suitable for one or two people? How do you survive days when your kids go to bed hungry? Where does your hope come from when you’re an 8-year-old child whose only concept of home includes a revolving door?

A recent four-part series by Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez on child poverty, especially as it relates to education, provides a painfully clear window into the lives of these children. The short film that starts the series is especially powerful, and a must watch for anyone who wants to understand the daily stress and trauma these children face.

I wish we lived in an America where homelessness didn’t exist; where kids could go to school without worrying about where they will sleep at night or if they will have enough food; where kids wouldn’t take on the burdens of adulthood. An America where kids could be kids – laughing, running, jumping, learning – the way they were meant to be.

So what can we do? We can start by speaking up, advocating for change, and accepting nothing less. Our friends need us, and we must deliver.

To view/read the full series:

Part 1: Hidden in L.A. suburbia, wrenching poverty preys on children and destroys dreams
Part 2: For the principal with the most homeless students in L.A., the reality of poverty is personal
Part 3: Whether home is a van, a motel or a garage, L.A.’s suburban poor children learn to survive
Part 4: For children trapped in poverty, breaking free is getting harder

Nov 27

Partnership with Junior League Blossoms

The Junior League of Los Angeles (JLLA) has partnered with School on Wheels on a project for 2018-19 to revitalize our “Believe, Understand, and Succeed” (BUS) program. As some of you may know, the BUS Program is an online mentoring and academic program meant to ensure student success both in and after high school. Broadly speaking, these lessons seek to foster educational success and provide guidance with education/career services for our high-school aged students who are experiencing homelessness.

This past year JLLA’s dedicated committee of 11 trained volunteers hosted four workshops at group homes belonging to The Dream Catcher Foundation, Inc. in downtown Los Angeles. They plan to host three new workshops in the spring of 2019, as well as hosting a campus tour for the young women. As of yet, the favorite training topics have been on emotional intelligence and conflict resolution! Sessions have included lots of fun icebreakers and group activities to aid discussion and the learning process. One particular highlight was an activity around positive reinforcement and complimenting others; needless to say, everyone was engaged and smiling!