Category: Advocacy

Jul 16

Get on The Bus College Club Contest 2021

Students experiencing homelessness will be returning to school this year with major learning losses. Help us recruit new tutors and spread the word so these students can get back on track with the support of a School on Wheels tutor.

Interested in becoming a School on Wheels volunteer online tutor?
Click here to get started!


Enter our Get on the Bus contest and start making a difference today! Earn points by completing the different options below. The more points you earn, the more likely you and your college club are to win!

contest software

School on Wheels is supported by college clubs across Southern California. With our Get on the Bus contest, these clubs can kick off the school year with some friendly competition and help us recruit new tutors. Make sure you answered the question above regarding which college you are supporting so we can give them credit for your entry.

If you are a college student but not currently part of a School on Wheels college club and would like to join one, please contact mfarfan@schoolonwheels.org. If you are a friend or family member of a college student, welcome! We are so glad to have your support.

Prizes

  • The winning college club will receive a Starbucks gift card with a value of $10 per club member that participated.
  • The individual winner will receive a School on Wheels swag box.
  • The contest ends on August 27th, 12:00 pm.
  • We are only accepting tutors who are current California residents; if you live out-of-state, please enter the contest using one or more of the other options!
  • The individual winner and the winning college club will be featured in our newsletter and on our social media platforms.
  • The winning college club will also have bragging rights!

Rules

Please only use one email address per person to participate in the contest. Questions, contact mfarfan@schoolonwheels.org.

Jul 29

Our 2019 Annual Report is OUT!

The School on Wheels 2019 Annual Report is available now for you to read in full on our website. Check out the photo slideshow—you might see a familiar face or two!

The way we serve our students may look a little different this year; still, our mission is the same. Watch Executive Director Charles Evans and President of the Board Josh Fein talk about 2019 and the changes 2020 has brought and read messages from our students, parents, and volunteers. Your work as a tutor, donor, cheerleader, and advocate for kids devastated by homelessness is more important now than ever. Please read about the impact you have made in our annual report,

May 28

May 2020 Update From Our Executive Director

Before the pandemic, we had already tutored more than 1,600 students experiencing homelessness with 1,250 volunteer tutors this year alone. We were well on our way to achieving—or even exceeding—our goal of tutoring 3,700 students. Our new improved literacy and digital learning programs were in full swing, fostering a love of reading and narrowing the digital divide for our students. Then, suddenly, normal life ceased and our reality transformed. Many people adapted. Meanwhile, our most vulnerable children face increased challenges in receiving a quality education. We at School on Wheels are determined more than ever to ensure our students get the help that they desperately need and deserve.

Today, we are focused on making sure that our students have access to a tutor, the internet, and technology so that they too can get online and access their classes. We are collaborating with our shelter partners, school districts, charter schools and other nonprofit partners to maximize our impact.

With your continued support, here is our most recent progress:

  • Conducted outreach to shelters, families and our volunteer tutors to gather information on their greatest needs and issues.
  • Strategized with LAUSD, LAHSA, LACOE and Mayor Garcetti’s team on ways to best support our students.
  • Partnered with several organizations and other nonprofits to distribute over 3,000 books, school supplies, Chromebooks, Wi-fi hotspots, tablets, kindles, hygiene kits, activity and science kits, and educational games and toys.
  • Re-trained our active volunteer base to tutor online and revamped our advanced training to address the new social and emotional needs caused by the pandemic.
  • Currently, more than 350 volunteer tutors⁠—with the support of our staff⁠—are regularly meeting with their students. That number continues to increase as more and more students are referred to our program.

We recognize that this pandemic will impact the world long-term, and while our lives will hopefully return to some semblance of normalcy, we expect online tutoring to become increasingly important for our students’ success over time. Our resource center is open for deliveries, but our staff is still working from home. As summer approaches, we need your support now more than ever, so that our kids don’t fall behind even further and have fun activities (albeit online) to keep them learning all summer long.

Mar 27

The Opportunity Myth: Low Expectations In Schools And The Impact On Our Students

A recent study from TNTP finds a pervasive pattern of low expectations schools that harms the most vulnerable students. The authors observed thousands of lessons in hundreds of schools, and found that majority white and high-income classrooms were more likely to have qualities that have a positive impact on student learning – strong instruction that encourages students to do most of the thinking, rather than lecturing; high expectations; grade-appropriate assignments; and deep student engagement. Having these factors in a classroom is especially impactful for students who start the year behind.

The study found that overall, students were only given grade level-appropriate work 26% of the time, meaning that even students that met expectations in school could be woefully unprepared for post-secondary education. 40% of classrooms with majority students of color never received a single grade-level assignment (compared with 10% of majority white classrooms). Classrooms with higher income students spent twice as much time on grade-appropriate work than those with lower-income students. In classrooms with majority students of color, 66% of teachers who were the same race as the majority of students had high expectations. Of teachers who were a different race from their students, 35% had high expectations. Students of color who got good grades were less likely to do well on state and AP tests than white students who got the same grades, indicating teachers in classrooms with mostly students of color had lower standards.

These findings have major implications for the students we serve. People of color are over-represented in the homeless population. According to LAHSA, 36% of people experiencing homelessness in LA County are Black or African-American, and 35% are Latino. Only 25% are white. Homeless children are also likely to attend schools in low-income areas. In addition, students experiencing homelessness are often behind their grade level – moving schools can cause a student to lose 3-6 months of learning. Our students are among those who are the most in need of the impactful factors identified by the study.

Youth experiencing homelessness need caring people to invest and believe in them. If our students are not challenged and engaged with meaningful work, they cannot achieve their full potential, and may struggle to succeed later in life. In order to break the cycle of homelessness, our students need supportive learning environments where they are encouraged and expected to do their best.

Nov 28

Whether home is a van, a motel or a garage, L.A.’s suburban poor children learn to survive

Thousands of families experience homelessness on any given night in America, leaving many children stricken by the grief of instability and unpredictability. There is a saying in Skid Row, “homeless but not hopeless.” But where does your hope come from if you’re the mother of four young, energetic children crammed in a motel room suitable for one or two people? How do you survive days when your kids go to bed hungry? Where does your hope come from when you’re an 8-year-old child whose only concept of home includes a revolving door?

A recent four-part series by Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez on child poverty, especially as it relates to education, provides a painfully clear window into the lives of these children. The short film that starts the series is especially powerful, and a must watch for anyone who wants to understand the daily stress and trauma these children face.

I wish we lived in an America where homelessness didn’t exist; where kids could go to school without worrying about where they will sleep at night or if they will have enough food; where kids wouldn’t take on the burdens of adulthood. An America where kids could be kids – laughing, running, jumping, learning – the way they were meant to be.

So what can we do? We can start by speaking up, advocating for change, and accepting nothing less. Our friends need us, and we must deliver.

To view/read the full series:

Part 1: Hidden in L.A. suburbia, wrenching poverty preys on children and destroys dreams
Part 2: For the principal with the most homeless students in L.A., the reality of poverty is personal
Part 3: Whether home is a van, a motel or a garage, L.A.’s suburban poor children learn to survive
Part 4: For children trapped in poverty, breaking free is getting harder